hide

Read Next

Should non-professionals research their own investments?

Patri Friedman left this very smart comment on the convincing arguments post -

I’m pretty skeptical of whether researching investments is a good idea for non-professionals. Financial speculation is fun, but you are competing against specialists who have spent their whole lives studying the subject, have teams of researchers, and are betting so much that they can afford to buy the best computers, data, etc. I think almost everyone should just buy the Vanguard Target Retirement 20X0 fund.

The exception is if you’re in the startup world & you know people who you trust & respect who are doing startups, angel investing in them w/ 10%-20% of your income makes sense to me. At worst you’ll lose a little money & learn a lot about who to trust & how startups work. Another is if you know a city/region/country very well and want to own property there – ownership has advantages (ie we have done extensive customization of our cohousing community here in Mountain View) and since it’s such a big asset it’s definitely worth researching.

This is a great point.

I've been studying a lot of finance lately. One that I've really enjoyed is "The Intelligent Investor" by Ben Graham.

Turning Crumpled Paper Into Capital

I think many people fail to realize that small amounts of money -- those crumpled little notes of ten pounds sterling, the blue NTD bill, or the Andy Jack bills in America -- these things, worked correctly, turn into capital.

Yes, really, truly.

The process is simple: you open an account that's separate from your main bank account. (I like Capital One 360 checking, which gives a $50 bonus for joining, or Schwab Investor Checking which reimburses ATM fees).

Rendering New Theme...