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Stupid People Aren't a Problem. Oblivious People Are a Problem.

When I was a bit younger, I used to think stupid people were a problem.

I don't know how I'd define stupid exactly, but you know roughly what I mean. I thought, "Stupid people cause problems."

Now I'm starting to change my mind.

However you define "stupid," I don't think it's stupid people causing problems. There's lots of things I'm unskilled, uneducated, or unsophisticated about, but I tend to know I'm unskilled, uneducated, and unsophisticated about it. If I got into a metalworking shop, I'd quickly ask someone there what I'm supposed to do to stay safe, and then I'd stay the hell out of the way.

You see, I'm stupid about metalworking and metalworking safety, but that's okay. I'm rarely in a metalworking shop, I'd ask for guidance/instructions if I was, and I'd be careful and stay out of the way.

Carlos Miceli's Excellent Ikigai Review

Carlos Miceli sent this wonderful review out to his newsletter. I love it, whether you've gotten the book or not yet, you'll definitely enjoy some of the points in it -

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Book recommendation - Ikigai, by Sebastian Marshall

Sebastian Marshall, who has recently became popular online because of his stand against traditional publishing, put together a brilliant set of philosophies, ideas, recommendations and statements for anyone that's serious about becoming a better person. This is not fluffy self-development. It's serious stuff for hard-working people that can take an honest look at themselves. Ikigai, which was marketed as the "one-week book", is not original work, but a compilation of Sebastian's fundamental posts of his blog. The book is divided in chapters such as "Be Principled", "Empire", "Rationality", and "Dealing with Shit", and each chapter has a series of posts and Sebastian's answers on that particular topic.

I loved the book, and read it in a couple of days. Sebastian succeeds at making you want to do amazing things with the time that's been given to you. The reason that Sebastian gets to you is because he's real. He's had a weird life, he's kinda crazy, and he truly acts on principles. The book combines three elements very well: practicality, unconventionality and reach. Anyone can grow from reading Ikigai and applying its lessons.

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