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The Nature of Religion

Hello Mr. Marshall!

I have been a reader of your blog for quite a while now, and I decided it's time to try to connect with you. I am very impressed by the quality of your blog posts and I enjoy reading them daily. And I am aware that you don't have much time for reading emails lately (which is good, people reach out to you and they should reach out. It is great that you offer yourself like this!), so I'll try to keep my first email brief.

I am starting to grow an interest in existentialism, religious and spiritual philosophy. Since I'm just starting this field I would like to start off with the right material, so I was wondering if you could recommend me some books or other material on these subjects?

Of course I completely understand if you don't have time for it, or if this email flies right into the trash folder - some things are not meant to be.

In any case, I wish you kind regards. S

Dominant Strategies

On Gorilla Tactics

I recently purchased an indie(?) darling(?) on Steam called Magicka. Recently released by Arrowhead Game Studios, Magicka is satirical action-adventure game about mages, saving the world, and vampires, or not.

There are a few great reviews out there which cover the game in detail, so I'll kind of skim over that and instead get to the meat (or veggie burger for you vegetarians) of what I'd like to talk about today: Dominant Strategies. Magicka is a great example of a game that fails to prevent dominant strategies from occurring, and why this matters.

A Dominant Strategy is a strategy or method of acting within a game/life which is vastly superior to the majority of other options in most contexts.

As humans, we are wired to use optimal strategies. That is, if we know a better way of doing something, we prefer to use that method. After all, why take longer or use more effort when you can do it faster or with less effort? So! If a game has one or two Dominant Strategies, it doesn't matter how many other choices are available, the human mind ends up categorizing them as "Optimal vs Sub-Optimal". If you always pick the optimal solution, the game can quickly become boring; if you choose a sub-optimal solution, you may feel bad because you aren't doing the best that you can.

Most well balanced games include abilities which are superior in specific situations, but weak in others. This means the player must figure out what abilities to use based on the situation - their choice is important. Other games have abilities which are roughly equal in overall power, but different in effect (setting people on fire vs electrocuting them). Again, this leads to varied play-styles and infuses the players choices with import. Let's check out Magicka as a case study.

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