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Want to get more out of life? Look to video games for inspiration

Question from a reader -

Kaizan (I believe this was the word encapsulating the concept that small but regular efforts both build momentum and create a larger effect)

You seem to have some of the best discipline and commitment I've seen in anyone. Quite frankly I have the toughest time fighting the urgency of the present for the promised windfalls of the future. Are there any tips you have for effectively depriving oneself now for greater long-term success? If you feel as though each small effort has no measurable impact, beyond the short-term perceived negative effects, how do you justify and reason that the long-term positive effects will come. E.g. how do you say "no I can't drink this coffee with milk in it because I'm avoiding carbs" or "I can't buy this interesting book because I'm trying to save" when the correlation between those individual events and the desired result (weight-control/savings) is unmeasurable?

I'm not sure the exact year, but somewhere around 2008 to 2010 I started thinking about why video games are so easy for people to get engaged in.

When you look at it objectively, a lot of video games are more difficult, more time-consuming, and more tedious than getting large real life successes.

Learning on the "S" curve - applicable to everything we do

On Kicking Thoughts

Besides being an excellent clip from a workshop, this video is extraordinary in another way. It is a perfect example of learning on the "S" curve.

I read an article recently at HBR.org on "S" curve market penetration and learning. Here's an excerpt from the article:

As we look to develop competence within a new domain of expertise, moving up a personal learning curve, initially progress is slow. But through deliberate practice, we gain traction, entering into a virtuous cycle that propels us into a sweet spot of accelerating competence and confidence. Then, as we approach mastery, the vicious cycle commences: the more habitual what we are doing becomes, the less we enjoy the “feel good” effects of learning: these two cycles constitute the S-curve.

I don't want to give away the entire article, in case you'd like to read it for yourself, but suffice to say, it's up to us as individuals to challenge our own methods of thinking and doing. Many times, that challenge comes in the form of external stimuli.

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