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High upside no downside has practically *zero* risk. Why don't we do it? I don't know.

A nice email, and good questions -

your blog has helped me really transform my life in a matter of a week or so. I've never had so mcuh motivation, to do even simple things like clean up my workspace. it only seems to be getting better from here and it really is because of you. every morning i read your blog and get fresh insight into myself.

I've started getting books you've recommended, and so far so good. It would be great if you could suggust some more for me, particulary about getting the motivation to take a risk.

I'm having trouble making myself have passion for what i love, although everyday it seems to be getting a small bit easier. I have started to track my time, and so far even the fact that I'm doing it gets me more motivated knowing i cam keep up a system.

Thanks for the kind words. It'd be great if I could suggest some books on taking a risk?

Time Tracking v10.1

When ever you start measuring something, you need to weigh the cost of measurement against the gains gotten from it.

Thus, it doesn't always make sense to track a metric. It can make a lot of sense to do it for a short time, understand how you're operating, make improvements, and then drop the tracking.

That's how it goes for me with filling out a time tracking sheet. I'll do it for a while to establish routines and make improvements, and then go off the process at other times during busy periods, or if I'm not getting much gain from it.

Here's my newest time tracking sheet. I fill this out daily, starting from the morning, and ending when I mark down the last notes at night. Explanation follows below --

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