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How do I write so much, you ask? Well, glad you asked -

A few of my friends - three friends, to be exact - mentioned to me that I write a heck of a lot on here and they're impressed. I have convinced the ultra-smart Sami Baqai to start blogging, and he just got the holy-shit-this-is-hard-I'm-overwhelmed feeling. Ah, yes, I have been there Sami. Perhaps I can share some thoughts.

First and foremost, I am a huge devotee of the Equal-Odds Rule. As far as I know, I'm the only person talking about it outside of academia. This Amazon review covers it pretty well:

The equal-odds rule says that the average publication of any particular scientist does not have any statistically different chance of having more of an impact than any other scientist's average publication. In other words, those scientists who create publications with the most impact, also create publications with the least impact, and when great publications that make a huge impact are created, it is just a result of "trying" enough times. This is an indication that chance plays a larger role in scientific creativity than previously theorized.

So I read that, and I'm like - whoa. You know Neo in the Matrix? Whoa.

If you want to make excellent stuff, you need to make a lot of stuff.

Historical Fiction Book Recommendations

On Tynan

It's been a long time since I've shared book recommendations, but I've been reading a lot and have stumbled upon some great books recently. I normally read non-fiction, but I've been integrating some fiction as well. I used to think of it as a less worthy use of time, but I've since read that reading fiction increases empathy (something I'm bad at), and I think/hope that it will improve my own writing. These are all books that I rated five stars.

Musashi (amazon)

After reading a few short fun books in a row, I thought that I'd switch to something more difficult and less enjoyable. Sebastian had recommended Musashi to me, and given the book's 900 page length, I figured it would be a tough one to get through. I was wrong-- Musashi was actually one of the most enjoyable books I've ever read. Meal times are the only times during which I'm allowed to visit sites like Reddit, but Musashi was so good that I read it during every solo meal time until I finished it.

Musashi is a historical fiction based around the life of Miyamoto Musashi. Many details, like the names of his opponents and his tactics during duels are historically accurate. Others are period accurate, but didn't necessarily happen. The result is that you get a really fascinating story, learn quite a bit about Japan in the late 16th and early 17th centuries, and you also learn a lot about Musashi's philosophy.

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