hide

Read Next

Wanting Everyone to Win

I just got a good email from a friend about emotions and biochemistry. It got me thinking.

Envy and schadenfreude are common emotions. People like seeing their opponents fail.

Is it possible to get over that? Would it be desirable to get over that?

I think envy and schadenfreude and hatred are usually a detriment to people feeling them. This is obvious enough when you're playing a positive sum game - because Positive Sum Games Don't Require Natural Talent, and have a near infinite opportunity for success. Disciplines like inventing, engineering, finance, entrepreneurship, mathematics, and the natural sciences work hand in hand. Every win by an inventor opens lots of doors for engineering, finance, entrepreneurship, math, and science. And indeed, for other inventors.

A lot of people mistake positive sum games - like the economy at large - for a zero sum game. They think that if you get money, they'll get less money. Of course, it doesn't work like that, as our exponentially growing standard of living shows. Even if someone loses a local conflict (to gain market share in a new technology, for instance) they can still go on to invent and innovate in a new field.

FAT: A Brief Introduction

On Natural Health Hack

The idea that saturated fat is the primary cause of obesity and heart disease is finally changing course in the medical and health community. Gary Taubes, an American science writer in his book “Why We Get Fat and What to Do About It” hypothesizes that Carbohydrates generate insulin, which causes the body to store fat. It’s been a long road from when Proctor & Gamble’s Crisco was invented in the early 1900’s and soon became a household name. It was the first time Hydrogenated oils were used and because they were plant based, were thought to be a better cooking oil than it’s immediate predecessor: Lard. Entire industries and new food-like products sprang up as a result of this newly found, supposedly “heart healthy” oil product that was cheap, easy to make and very shelf stable.

[above] Spoonful of Coconut goodness - it is liquid above 76 degrees. Solid, like in this image below 76.

Unfortunately, the data didn’t ever support this, then or now, and it’s pretty clear that diets with less saturated fat generally have a higher rate of heart disease. That’s one of the reasons Coconut oil is “all the rage” now, and seen on every aisle and every health blog out there. Back in the 80’s, the American Soybean Association went on a PR blitz trying to obliterate all other tropical oils to make way for their vegetable oils. Well, it worked. To this day, the myth of coconut oil in particular being unhealthy still lingers, because unlike most vegetable oils, it is indeed high in saturated fat…and considered downright evil.

Keep in mind that Coconut Oil has been a staple in the diets (and for endless topical uses as well) of most of the world’s tropical populations without any history of heart disease. What the food-oil industry PR campaigns missed was that while Coconut oil is indeed saturated, there are many varying types of fats. Coconut Oil consists mainly of medium chain fatty acids. In laymen’s terms, this means that this kind of fat is burned immediately, as a source of energy, and not stored as fat OR converted to cholesterol (thus also punching holes in the theory that Cholesterol is fat’s evil partner as another key contributor to heart disease). None of this news on saturated fats is to say that all saturated fats are good in endless amounts, so don't go thinking tons of fast food burgers are suddenly okay.

Rendering New Theme...