hide

Read Next

Guest Post: Breaking Through Your Orbit of Inertia

Ivan Ilic, a professional pianist, just reached out with a guestpost and reaction after reading "I think the biggest barrier for me to overcome was myself." Some really fantastic observations on breaking through in here -

Sebastian’s last post was inspirational to me, but not because of the story itself, poignant though it was. Although I would love to read a more detailed account of R’s unusually successful turnaround, there was a turn of phrase in Sebastian’s response that really resonated with me.

“The good news and bad news is that there’s almost never a silver bullet. So, you can safely stop looking for [it] and start picking up 1% edges, 2% edges here and there. Trend upwards and establish little good habits, a better environment around you, and so on. R covers this when he says, “Make sure that all the small steps you take are taking you in the right direction. A little bit at a time, over a long period, and you’ll always win.”

The only way to realize the power of incremental positive changes over time is by experiencing it yourself. Although self-discipline has not been my biggest problem, I had a serious slump in the second half of last year. When I needed to move my most important projects forward, I seemed paralyzed. Does that sound familiar?

The past six months have been the first time I have orchestrated my own turnaround, without external factors to motivate me. “Picking up 1% edges, 2% edges here and there” and establishing modest good habits has been so effective that looking back over the past six months, I’m still shocked.

The Importance of Showing Off

On Gorilla Tactics

Showing off is super important. I don’t mean that in the hot-rod, flashy, “Look at my car and my super awesome muscles” way… though if I have to say so, my muscles ARE super awesome. What I mean is, it is very important to show your work to people. And not just show them, but PLAN to show them, and tell them about those plans so they can hold you accountable if you don’t.  

This point was driven home to me a few weeks ago when I showed off King Randall’s Party at the Made in Mass Developers Party, which occurs every year before PAX East. Hosted by some friendly faces at Microsoft, people treat it mostly as a party; great beer and food is served, and we are surrounded by our fellow developers. At the same time there are tons of tables where developers from MA can show off their games and provide entertainment for the party goes. It’s a real win-win type of event.  

In the months leading up to the party before it was confirmed that I would have a table, I had been working hard on KRP, or so I thought. After I got confirmation that I would have a table at the event, my development speed jumped tremendously. Just the thought that I would have hundreds of people looking at my game really drove me to produce higher quality work, faster. I've noticed this effect also occurs whenever I tell someone – a friend, family member, or someone else whose opinion I highly regard, that I’ll show them XYZ on such and such date.

Rendering New Theme...