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Mastery: The fast horse doesn't need the whip, thus doesn't learn to the deepest level

I'm reading "Mastery" by George Leonard.

The book is odd. It's excellent in some ways, it's an exceptionally grounded and pragmatic book. I recommend it.

But, it's a bit of a downer. For instance, I just read Donald Trump's "Think Big and Kick Ass", and after reading it, you feel ready to go climb a mountain, kill a lion with your bare hands, lay waste to an enemy army, and otherwise build an empire.

Mastery isn't like that. Mastery is someone reminding you that success doesn't come easy, that it's a long hard slog through lots of plateaus, and that you should enjoy the process because that's the only way you'll get through it.

In a way, it's an uplifting message if you can really internalize it. It'll help give you strength during the plateaus. It immediately answered some questions I've had recently. Recently I wrote in "A Strange Pattern I’ve Noticed in Productivity" -

Musashi (Reflections On)

On Huan M. Nguyen

Because of the recommendations by Tynan and Sebastian Marshall, I picked up Musashi by Eiji Yoshikawa.

It was well worth the time it took to finish nine hundred pages of well-written, gripping samurai action, love, and life lessons.

The following is a list of symptoms:

I use the word symptoms in jest, but if this list applies to you, then I'm positive that there are fiction books out there in every genre that have appealed to you immensely at some point. A few of mine are Ender's Game, any Forgotten Realms books, the Inheritance Saga (Eragon, and sequels), and many more.

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