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Better Project Planning Means Less Project Failure, by Kevin Archbold

I'm incredibly pleased to bring you this interview with Kevin Archbold, a 25-year veteran in project management and a 13-year consultant and teacher of the specialty. This opens the door to people who have excellent skills to better managing their projects and getting better communication going. This one is dense, but work through it carefully because it's a life-changing skill and Archbold is a master at this topic.

You might also be interested in his GiveGetWin deal, "Real-Time Live-Fire Project Management Training With Kevin Archbold" where you'll bring two sentences describing a project you want to the 5-person class, and leave with a project charter filled out.

Better Project Planning Means Less Project Failure by Kevin Archbold, as told to Sebastian Marshall

My background is project management. Most people have a career in a technical field first and then move into project management, but I went directly into PM after University in England. I found it was a good fit for me and stuck with it ever since.

I've got a CompSci degree, but no one's ever paid me to program anything. I started in the telecommunications industry, and then moved through many other industries: 10 years around Detroit, working on a lot of automotive and time at a nuclear power plant. I've worked on internet startups and biotech in Seattle, spent time with the City Government in Seattle, and have been in Tucson for seven years now -- doing mining-related projects and astronomy related projects… a whole gamut of things. I do not provide technical expertise; I bring fundamental project management.

On Bear Traps & Being with People

On Made of Metaphors

I drew that illustration a few days ago, on Christmas.

In my family, Christmas is about being with people. I have a large family, largely of Roman Catholic Irish ancestry, and I see a lot of them when I fly back to the east coast for Christmas. I find it an interesting challenge to be with them all. I don't mean that they're hard to be with in the sense that they're rude, or have poor hygiene, or run rapidly through the house or hide under tables. I just mean that it takes a lot of attention from me to really make the most of the time I have with each of them.

The ability to be with someone else is the ability to give them your attention - simple as that. I don't think I'm especially great at this, but I am writing about it because I have met people who do this very well, and it's obviously very important to do. I think practicing being with people is one of the most valuable ways that I spend my energy.

I also think that without role models, without having met people who do this well, I wouldn't "get it" even to the extent I do now. I think experiencing this is really important because, as an experience, it loses something in the retelling. If I can inspire you to do one thing in reading this post, I would like for it to be this: seek out people who are very good at being present with others. Experience it for yourself. I dare you to leave unmoved.

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