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Getting Past Shiny Things: Choosing Core Metrics, Selecting Your Projects From Them

No one celebrates Thanksgiving in Taiwan, and my business partner is Canadian. But the majority of our clients are American, so the normal rigors of client calls and sales calls were wiped from the slate, leaving us a day to evaluate where exactly we were at.

It was both inspiring and shocking. If you're a small-business owner, I'd highly recommend you check out this post. I'm going to walk you through how we identified everything we could be doing, what we were doing well and poorly, and how we chose metrics to measure success and let that dictate our projects.

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The first thing we wanted to do is figure out exactly what we had implicitly or explicitly committed to.

When we calculated how many internal projects and initiatives we had active, or that we wanted to start in the near future, we realized we had 42 current internal projects that would represent hundreds if not thousands of hours to complete.

On Design Driving Everything, by Joshua Gross

Joshua Gross has been interested in the intersection of art and computers since he was nine years old -- and it shows. He's regularly brought into companies at incredibly high rates to improve their front-end design and user experience, and consult with management over ensuring their products connect with customers. This interview is key for startup founders, programmers, product managers, and people in venture capital: if you're needing to understand what makes a product good for an end user, Joshua Gross is illuminating.

Joshua is currently offering a GiveGetWin deal "Get User-Centric to Win" -- perfect for startup founders, investors, those working on UI/UX, and other front-end developers, product managers, and creatives.

Design Drives Everything, by Joshua Gross, as told to Sebastian Marshall

Design really is the fundamental way a product works and interacts with the end user, the person using the product. It's more than how something looks or how it feels. It's how it looks, feels, works, and you could even go as far as to say it's why it works the way it does.

A chair is designed to fit the human form, for instance. Imagine you didn't take people into consideration when designing a chair, and only took into account making it look good. It could be too skinny, or have a bad angle, or otherwise be wildly uncomfortable. It doesn't make sense to make a chair to look pretty, you do it for people to sit on.

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