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Comment: "I have learned that my opinion has a multiplier attached (like -.5 perhaps)"

This comment by Chris was on "People tend to like their own opinion more than your opinion" - a bit of an older post, and a nice comment, I thought it was worth making sure everyone saw it -

Hey Sebastian, nice post and nice blog! I'm a new reader this week... As it happens, I am a single founder as well but already have some investors / experienced startup guys on board. And every time we have a difference of opinion, the scenario you describe plays out anew! I have learned that my opinion has a multiplier attached (like -.5 perhaps), and the multiplier is significantly smaller then theirs. :) Over the last couple of years I've really struggled with the line between listening to their advice and taking it even when I think there's a better way. One big example stands out where they thought I should do A, I thought we should do B, and I had tons of research to support my ideas. We did B, and when the dust settled I was completely wrong. In the end we learned from it and failing is where you practice succeeding, so I don't hold it against myself. You have to take risks and put yourself on the line. But the lesson reduced my stubbornness by a lot and these days I try harder to understand the voice of experience, and really question my ideas before I get attached to them.

Good stuff here.

Fixed Downside, High Upside Thinking

Today I'd like to introduce you to Venkat Rao. He writes Ribbonfarm, and he's mastered the difficult challenge of writing smart, novel, entertaining, eloquent, controversial, and accessible content - at the same time. Most people can't do this.

Venkat wrote an excellent reply on Quora to the question, "Is it hard to build, market and maintain a web app that makes at least $1000 a month?" Quora's TOS actually allows you to republish things in full with attribution (and some other requirements), and I thought this would be an excellent introduction to Venkat for you.

This whole reply is brilliant. He's got the orders of magnitude on money, time, and requirements basically dead-on. Extraordinarily impressive read here -

"Is it hard to build, market and maintain a web app that makes at least $1000 a month?"

This is a very interesting question, and the responses are very revealing. It is instantly clear who knows what they are talking about.

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