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The Nature of Religion

Hello Mr. Marshall!

I have been a reader of your blog for quite a while now, and I decided it's time to try to connect with you. I am very impressed by the quality of your blog posts and I enjoy reading them daily. And I am aware that you don't have much time for reading emails lately (which is good, people reach out to you and they should reach out. It is great that you offer yourself like this!), so I'll try to keep my first email brief.

I am starting to grow an interest in existentialism, religious and spiritual philosophy. Since I'm just starting this field I would like to start off with the right material, so I was wondering if you could recommend me some books or other material on these subjects?

Of course I completely understand if you don't have time for it, or if this email flies right into the trash folder - some things are not meant to be.

In any case, I wish you kind regards. S

On Design Driving Everything, by Joshua Gross

Joshua Gross has been interested in the intersection of art and computers since he was nine years old -- and it shows. He's regularly brought into companies at incredibly high rates to improve their front-end design and user experience, and consult with management over ensuring their products connect with customers. This interview is key for startup founders, programmers, product managers, and people in venture capital: if you're needing to understand what makes a product good for an end user, Joshua Gross is illuminating.

Joshua is currently offering a GiveGetWin deal "Get User-Centric to Win" -- perfect for startup founders, investors, those working on UI/UX, and other front-end developers, product managers, and creatives.

Design Drives Everything, by Joshua Gross, as told to Sebastian Marshall

Design really is the fundamental way a product works and interacts with the end user, the person using the product. It's more than how something looks or how it feels. It's how it looks, feels, works, and you could even go as far as to say it's why it works the way it does.

A chair is designed to fit the human form, for instance. Imagine you didn't take people into consideration when designing a chair, and only took into account making it look good. It could be too skinny, or have a bad angle, or otherwise be wildly uncomfortable. It doesn't make sense to make a chair to look pretty, you do it for people to sit on.

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