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Try Losing Some Moral Battles and Winning Some Real Ones

I'm really thrilled to bring you a guest post by Dan Andrews. He runs a product development company in San Diego, runs the Tropical MBA blog, and the Lifestyle Business Podcast. Some really good insights on there, and he's a really solid guy too. Here's Dan -

Try Losing Some Moral Battles and Winning Some Real Ones

When you are bemoaning the success or victory of others, you are generally seeking to achieve a sort of victory yourself. Let's call this a moral victory. Moral victories are addicting. You can achieve them at will. They magically appear whenever you need a boost.

Moral victories do one thing: they make losers feel like they’ve gotten some victory.

Moral victories are popular with people when they feel like they have no real power to make changes in the world. This makes some sense to me-- building power, wealth, and influence is generally difficult.

On Design Driving Everything, by Joshua Gross

Joshua Gross has been interested in the intersection of art and computers since he was nine years old -- and it shows. He's regularly brought into companies at incredibly high rates to improve their front-end design and user experience, and consult with management over ensuring their products connect with customers. This interview is key for startup founders, programmers, product managers, and people in venture capital: if you're needing to understand what makes a product good for an end user, Joshua Gross is illuminating.

Joshua is currently offering a GiveGetWin deal "Get User-Centric to Win" -- perfect for startup founders, investors, those working on UI/UX, and other front-end developers, product managers, and creatives.

Design Drives Everything, by Joshua Gross, as told to Sebastian Marshall

Design really is the fundamental way a product works and interacts with the end user, the person using the product. It's more than how something looks or how it feels. It's how it looks, feels, works, and you could even go as far as to say it's why it works the way it does.

A chair is designed to fit the human form, for instance. Imagine you didn't take people into consideration when designing a chair, and only took into account making it look good. It could be too skinny, or have a bad angle, or otherwise be wildly uncomfortable. It doesn't make sense to make a chair to look pretty, you do it for people to sit on.

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