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Finish and Thus Don't Duplicate

Want to hear one of the strangest things I've found by time tracking?

Often, a really big and important task will only take 20 minutes of time to do when I sit down to get it done.

The thing is, it's not really 20 minutes. It's 20 minutes of action, after already spending three hours thinking about it over the course of a few days.

But it dawns on me - the hardest part of many hazy tasks is figuring out what to do. Almost any time we look at a hard task, our mind runs through the quick options and makes a decision.

A lot of times, we leave things alone if there's no great action to take. But, that means we're probably duplicating the thinking part of the effort many, many times.

Professionals: Present a confident exterior, consult with colleagues/references in private

Some good replies to the post "Conflict of Interest: On Confidence, and Confidence."

One of things that stood out to me is how a couple commenters assumed that because they're reasonable, other people should also be reasonable. I mean, if a doctor checks something carefully in a reference book in front of me, I think that's a good thing. You probably do too.

But many people don't think that way.

A lot of people have unrealistic expectations of the world, especially of professionals like doctors.

There was a brilliant comment by Kate Johnson, who is a veterinarian. Kate writes -

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